School bans interracial dating

But, alas, when I approached a group of undergrads, they broke the bad news: "We're not technically allowed to talk to reporters unless we have the school's permission," as one of them explained.

Besides, according to Pew, 37 percent of Americans would still have "some problem" with a family member marrying someone of a different race.The institution may have been broken, but the prejudice hasn't disappeared.Meanwhile, other folks had some real explaining to do.But people who knew I’d attended the school wanted to hear my take on the matter.Advertisement Obligingly, I wrote an opinion piece describing my experiences inside the Bob Jones University bubble and urging more tolerance for different points of view.

But it was consistent with the school's general message as articulated by its leaders, its rules for student life, and its areas of study: Don't trust anything you hear off campus.

At the University bookstore (located right next door to "Great Awakenings" coffee shop), for instance, pamphlets about the Freemasons and the "the facts" about the Roman Catholic church are sprinkled in amongst anti-Darwin screeds and American exceptionalist tracts.

Interracial marriage in the United States has been fully legal in all U. states since the 1967 Supreme Court decision that deemed anti-miscegenation laws unconstitutional, with many states choosing to legalize interracial marriage at earlier dates.

Multiracial Americans numbered 9.0 million in 2010, or 2.9% of the total population, but 5.6% of the population under age 18.

The differing ages of individuals, culminating in the generation divides, have traditionally played a large role in how mixed ethnic couples are perceived in American society.

Interracial marriages have typically been highlighted through two points of view in the United States: Egalitarianism and cultural conservatism.